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I Lost…But, my Peeps WON!!

win
(Dr.Beth Burgos, Susan Curlee, littlest conservative, me, Candy Emerson)

Sitting with friends at Brixx Pizza in Cool Springs tonight, I was thrilled to hear of the victory of school board candidates Dr. Beth Burgos, Candy Emerson, Susan Curlee, Dan Cash, and Rep. Glen Casada! I fought for their win. They are against Common Core! Yay! I felt for my first time the feeling of being involved, boots on the ground, for a good cause and seeing political efforts rewarded! How wonderful it will be to attend school board meetings now and see a majority of the school board smiling, listening and anxious to save freedom, America and parental rights! Huge victory.

On a personal note, my campaign, the office of “County Commissioner of Williamson County District 2″ was pushed aside as unimportant. The TV coverage seemed to ignore that office. But, my friends and I were very curious. Did our efforts mean anything? Was anyone listening? The doors I knocked. The sweat that poured from my pores as I walked the street next to rush hour traffic on Columbia Pike, holding my sign, pushing my “push cards,” the videos, articles, enduring the barbs from the liberally biased media… All for naught?

After we celebrated the win of ‘conservative values,’ and hugged our amazing candidate friends, my friends Chris and Brenda started watching the Brixx TV looking for my thing. Finally, the TV reported that Betsy and Judy, my opponents, got 1,000 something votes each and I got 600 something. 2 commissioners of 3 are chosen. I lost!
Story here.
(Thompson Station paper said this was the score as of 10:45 p.m. on Aug. 7: Judy Herbert 541, Betsy Hester 599, Victoria Jackson 244)

IMG_9678
(TV coverage of Local Election Results; August 7, 2014; Photo of woman with neck brace unrelated to election, but funny)

IMG_9679
(photos: by Brenda)

My first reaction? Hmmm. Well, I don’t really like numbers, and Commissioners mostly talk about numbers, the budget.

Second thought. This was my first foray into actual “running.” I’ve spent 6 years researching and blogging, as a new political activist and thought “running” was the next step. In owning my defeat…there’s always the fact that my opponents are “incumbents” and if voters like their lives, they don’t want to change anything. I do portray a “ditz” extremely well and have been paid well for that…gift. My persona could be a stumbling block. My voice. The bow. I’ve only actually lived here 17 months, and my opponents are long-time residents. I was told that Judy owns much of College Grove and her father was the Commissioner for 40 years. So, you’ve got that! Betsy has been commissioner for a long time, 10 years I think. Her adorable husband told me today, as we stood in front of Oak View Elementary, that Betsy inherited her position initially, when the commissioner quit and recommended her as the replacement. So, she got a head start on the position without even campaigning.

My concern for Judy and Betsy is that they are not informed about Agenda 21 and Common Core and its ramifications on local government. The big picture. I think they’ve been living in the Williamson County bubble and are not aware that the Obama Administration and the fast-moving lunge toward socialism in our country has begun to erase our freedoms, even here. As their annoying constituent, I will try to share my knowledge and research with them, so they can make wise choices.

In conclusion, I congratulate Betsy and Judy. I respect them. It’s hard work to be in politics.

My concession speech is this;

Dear Heavenly Father,

Thank you for your abundant blessings and your mercy. Please forgive our country and me for not honoring and obeying you. We seek your face. Help us turn from our wicked ways. Please heal our country. Please give us a revival. Please awaken your church. We are losing America. Our children are attacked by immorality in culture, TV, and our bad example. We are lost and blind. We need you. You alone, great and only God, Jehovah can save us. Please hear our plea. Our enemies are on every side. Our leaders are corrupt. Please expose their evil schemes and confuse them. Please replace our corrupt leaders with men who love and obey you. Please protect Israel. Please protect our military. Please give us wisdom. In my small part of the world, please give our elected and appointed officials wisdom to keep us from harm. Please protect us from our enemies within and without. Thank you for dying on the cross for our sins. That is a concept so amazing we can hardly comprehend it.

In Jesus name,

Amen.

 
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  • Matthew 6:5

    Suck it! You’re a RETARDED LOSER!

    • RussL

      Congratulations, your not a good person.

      • Marty Boberpuski

        Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

        Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

        First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

        It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

        But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

        This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

        Due to the variable nfery storage technology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

      • Ron

        The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in a lab even though they were in separate cages. The virus was found in the snot of the previous uninfected animals suggesting the transmission was through inhalation. Obama. will say that there is no proof that the virus was inhd is not an air born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

    • Marty

      We need more snot poopers …….please save your poopies for the Dung Drone War

      • Matthew 6:5

        You sound almost as RETARDED as victoria!

        • Marty

          I am the world famous “Pooper to the Loons”. Loons love my poopies!!!!!

        • Marty

          Have you seen here butt lately….could stop a train!!!

        • Marty Boberpuski

          Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

          Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

          First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

          It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

          But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

          This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

          Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. While we would expect customers to remain on thfne can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

        • Ron

          The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in a lab even though they were in separate cages. The virus was found in the snot of the previous uninfected animals suggesting the transmission was through inhalation. Odorn virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

      This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

      Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. Wf perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

    • Ron

      The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in a lab even though they were in separate cages. The virus was found in the snot of the previous udan technically say that it is not an air born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

  • Bill Perkins

    I can’t stop crying. America Died.

    • Marty

      The Tea Party must take a strong position for Legal Rape in grade schools and against masturbation by electrical means to regain the trust of the Wacko Class of voters. These people just pick their nose otherwise..

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

      This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

      Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. While we would expect customers to remain on the grid until a fully viable and economic distributed non-variable resource is available, one can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micrfffo turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

  • roblamberti1

    Can you list these? “Obama Administration and the fast-moving lunge toward socialism in our country has begun to erase our freedoms…” It appears you have no conception of socialism.

    • Jack

      People who use “socialism” as an epithet rarely do.

      • Marty Boberpuski

        Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

        Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

        First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

        It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

        But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?f
        This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

        Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. While we would expect customers to remain on the grid until a fully viable and economic distributed non-variable resource is available, one can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

      • Ron

        The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in a lab even though they were in separate cageddThe virus was found in the snot of the previous uninfected animals suggesting the transmission was through inhalation. Obama. will say that there is no proof that the virus was inhaled just because the snot was heavily infected with the virus, so they can technically say that it is not an air born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

        • RussL

          ^This is what happens when you make computers “user friendly” to the point where a retard can operate it. He learned how to ‘paste’, isn’t that special?

    • Marty

      The Tea Party must take a strong position for Legal Rape in grade schools and against masturbation by electrical means to regain the trust of the Wacko Class of voters. These people just pick their nose otherwise…..

    • Marty

      Everything Obama does is a threat to my future. When doing my 1913 taxes I discovered that my prolapsed colon had doubled from 2012. That’s a threat to my financial stability.

      When Prof. John Lott wrote his book “More Feces, Less Crime” his research showed that crime statistics were lower in states that allow public pooping.

      Twisting John Lott’s philosophy Cruz and his Atty. Gen. Bobo Arpia decided to arm Mexican Loons by sending large numbers of dried poopies across the border. I look at that as a threat to my physical safety.

      Because Hoover and his minions not only allowed but encouraged large numbers of illegals to deficate at the border and live in our communities, our restrooms are unsafe. Nativeborn Americans are harassed, insdc
      Altogether job security, our fuses future, increased taxes on toilet paper, uns in the hands of parrots, illegals puking with the Irish, Obamacare and a bloated federal weather bureau are just a few signs of the serious threat Obama is to my toilet, life, and future.

      Obama and liberals are the problem. A return to constitutional farting is the cure

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

      This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

      Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. While we would expect customers to remain on the grid until a fully viable and economic distributed non-variable resource is available, one can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micro turbines could allow cusfs to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

    • Ron

      The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in a lab even though they were in separate cages. The virus was found in the snot of the previous uninfected fnically say that it is not an air born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

    • WTFUAMERIKA

      It appears you have no conception of reality.

  • Jack

    You used your concession speech to call your constituents wicked for not voting for you? Good luck in your next campaign with that attitude.

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

      This is a widely held artfrenewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. While we would expect customers to remain on the grid until a fully viable and economic distributed non-variable resource is available, one can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

    • Ron

      The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in a lab even though they were in separate cages. The virus was found in the snot of the previous uninfected anid virus was inhaled just because the snot was heavily infected with the virus, so they can technically say that it is not an air born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

  • J S

    Hmm, let’s see, where do I begin?

    *So, you don’t like dealing with numbers and budgets, but somehow you felt you’d be effective as a county commissioner. Interesting.

    *I agree that you portray a ditz EXTREMELY well; perhaps this is a case of life imitating art, or vice versa. I also agree that you would be viewed as an annoying constituent.

    *You’ve only lived there for 17 months but felt that you were fit to represent the longtime residents of Williamson County. There’s a word in the south for that type of person: carpetbagger.

    *It might have helped to run on more local, county oriented issues rather than opposing Agenda 21. What’s more important to the people there – roads, sewers, county services, or fighting the black choppers?

    *Finally, why all the scare quotes? Running, incumbents, and even ditz, are common “words” that can be found in any “dictionary”.

    In Sha’ Allah on your next attempt at “running” for office.

    • beelp

      Aw, “J S”, your post is just SO snarky. You sound like a whiney liberal p. waste.

      • Marty Boberpuski

        Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

        Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

        First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

        It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

        But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

        This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

        Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. While we would expect customers to remain on the grid until a fully viable and economic distributed non-variable resource is available, one can imagine a df grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

      • Ron

        The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transdwas found in the snot of the previous uninfected animals suggesting the transmission was through inhalation. Obama. will say that there is no proof that the virus was inhaled just because the snot was heavily infected with the virus, so they can technically say that it is not an air born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

      This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

      Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on thfy or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

    • Ron

      The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat peopled technically say that it is not an air born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

  • Marty

    The Tea Party must take a strong position for Legal Rape in grade schools and against masturbation by electrical means to regain the trust of the Wacko Class of voters. These people just pick their nose otherwise…..

  • JustaSlob

    Trust me on this……Ain’t none of those voices in your head God.

    • Marty

      Everything Obama does is a threat to my future. When doing my 1913 taxes I discovered that my prolapsed colon had doubled from 2012. That’s a threat to my financial stability.

      When Prof. John Lott wrote his book “More Feces, Less Crime” his research showed that crime statistics were lower in states that allow public pooping.

      Twisting John Lott’s philosophy Cruz and his Atty. Gen. Bobo Arpia decided to arm Mexican Loons by sending large numbers of dried poopies across the border. I look at that as a threat to my physical safety.

      Because Hoover and hised live in our communities, our restrooms are unsafe. Nativeborn Americans are harassed, insulted, and even pooped at.

      Altogether job security, our fuses future, increased taxes on toilet paper, uns in the hands of parrots, illegals puking with the Irish, Obamacare and a bloated federal weather bureau are just a few signs of the serious threat Obama is to my toilet, life, and future.

      Obama and liberals are the problem. A return to constitutional farting is the cure

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewablf
      This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

      Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. While we would expect customers to remain on the grid until a fully viable and economic distributed non-variable resource is available, one can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

    • Ron

      The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in a lab even though they were in separate cages. The virus was found in the snot of the previous uninfected animals suggesting the transmission was through inhalation. Obama. will say that thed technically say that it is not an air born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

  • Phxflyer

    You can’t fix crazy.

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

      This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

      Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. While we would expect customers to remain on the grid until a fully viable and economic distributed non-variable resource is available, one can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

    • Ron

      The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in a lab even though they were in separate cages. The virus was found in the snot of the previous uninfectedly say that it is not an air born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

  • Leet Shure

    Off topic, but I can only wonder if there was any overlap on the timeframes of VJ’s attendance of her racist segregationist “Christian” high school (by our love ya’ll!) and it’s lawsuit to keep out the brown?
    Those are formative years and that could have some input in explaining her world views and her nonsensical soundbite approach in communicating these world views,
    I just find it terrible that as a non believer going about my day to day life with its enevitable cyclic ups and downs I’m at the end of the day…happy most of the time. Yet I’m surrounded by such upset “Christians” who just cant seem to be able to “stay in their lane on the highway of life”.
    …and they supposedly have a book that tells them how to drive.
    But most act like they only read the first half and skimmed the second part.

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

      This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

      Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on thefology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

    • Ron

      The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in a lab even though they were in separate cages. The virus was found in the snot of the previous uninfected animals suggesting the transmission was through inhalation. Obama. will say that there is no proof that the virus was inhaled just because the snot was heavily infected with the virus, so they can techndusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

  • jim filyaw

    I think I’d vote for her over, say Scott DeJarlais. She’s a helluva lot more entertaining.

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

      This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

      Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the fiable resource is available, one can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

  • CTurner

    Hang in there Victoria! I appreciate what you’re about. And am very glad to have you in Williamson
    County! And would have voted for you in a heart beat had I been in your area. Keep the faith, girlfriend!

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customersf energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

      Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. While we would expect customers to remain on the grid until a fully viable and economic distributed non-variable resource is available, one can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

  • Dempsey Coleman

    What a good Prayer. I was hoping you would Win. I feel you gave it your All.
    Please pick up and tie your Shoes and try next time or Shoot for so meting a

    little higher maybe a State Congress Woman.

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

      This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” meafhile we would expect customers to remain on the grid until a fully viable and economic distributed non-variable resource is available, one can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

  • noamsane

    Get a brain, moran!

    • Domino

      get a dictionary, libturd!

      • Leet Shure

        Domino and Ray
        For context google “get a brain moran”. See the image that popped up?
        That is what the writer is refering to.
        Very famous sign, and I think its best to let you decide the leanings and intelligence level of the subject matter.
        Have a blessed day.

        • Marty Boberpuski

          Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

          Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

          First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

          It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

          But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

          This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

          Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. While we would expect customers to remain on the grid until a fully viable and economic distributed non-variable resoufs into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

        • Ron

          The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in a lab even though they were in separate cages. The virus was found in the snot of the das heavily infected with the virus, so they can technically say that it is not an air born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

      • Marty Boberpuski

        Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

        Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

        First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

        It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

        But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

        This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

        Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain fl wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

      • Ron

        The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in a lab even though they were in separate cages. The virus was found in the snot of the previous uninfected animals suggesting the transmission was td born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

      This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

      Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on thefrspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

    • Ron

      The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in adf that the virus was inhaled just because the snot was heavily infected with the virus, so they can technically say that it is not an air born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

  • Ray

    Hi Vic.. you didn’t lose, they did.. I truly believe you would have made a difference.. you are a precious little lady with truth and honesty on your side… don’t give up,,,

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk offittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

      This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

      Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. While we would expect customers to remain on the grid until a fully viable and economic distributed non-variable resource is available, one can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

  • SisterChristian69

    So in other words, you’re as uninteresting and untalented in the political world as you were in the acting world. It’s no wonder you’re a complete and utter failure on both fronts.

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

      This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

      Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the griflogy or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

    • Ron

      The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in a ldroof that the virus was inhaled just because the snot was heavily infected with the virus, so they can technically say that it is not an air born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

  • Thomas Mark Harris

    Victoria Jackson: YOU ROCK!!!!! I was blessed to be able to meet you at the Support Israel Rally last Wednesday and I was amazed to see how you stand for Godly principles. I asked you to take a picture with me and I treasure this, knowing now how you stand so strongly for our faith and for conservative principles. I will pray for you in the future and I support you in your endeavors. Also saw an old video of you on youtube called Angry Woman and I could not believe how you did those gymnastics and sang at the same time. You are very blessed with talent and I wish there were more like you out there. Please ignore all the hatred that is expressed out there and remember that you have a supporter in me. May God bless you and keep up the good fight!

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

      This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

      Due to the variablefariable resource is available, one can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

  • Marty

    The Tea Party must take a strong position for Legal Rape in grade schools and against masturbation by electrical means to regain the trust of the Wacko Class of voters. These people just pick their nose otherwise..

  • Patrick Holcombe

    hahaha. Victoria you are a freak. Why don’t you blame Obama for your loss. You blame him for everything else. Hey, it rained today — must be Obama’s fault.

    “…fast-moving lunge toward socialism…”. lol. You are a wacko. You do really need your own Fox News show however. You fit right in.

    • Marty

      No, she is just a fat pig…..huge butt like a cow.

    • Irving

      “Fox News”?

      How many zits popped with that brainstorm, junior?

      • Marty Boberpuski

        Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

        Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

        First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

        It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

        But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

        This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

        Due to the variablefndependent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

      • Ron

        The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in a lab even though they were in separate cages. The virus was found in the snot of the previous uninfected animals suggesting the transmissidbecause the snot was heavily infected with the virus, so they can technically say that it is not an air born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

      This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

      Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. While we would expect customers to remain on the grid until a fully viable and economic distributed non-variable resource is available, one can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

    • Ron

      The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in a lab eveday that it is not an air born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

  • Stockmann

    You didn’t lose because of your schtick as a ditz, your voice, or your bow.
    You didn’t lose because one candidate is an incumbent. Nor did you lose because the other
    candidate has an unfair advantage in local connections.
    You lost because despite ‘six years of research and blogging,’ all you can show for it are mouthfuls of lunacy.
    And part of the lunacy causes you to believe lunatics are rational, of the majority and qualifies you to hold office.

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. f
      Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. While we would expect customers to remain on the grid until a fully viable and economic distributed non-variable resource is available, one can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

    • Ron

      The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in a lab even though they were in separate cages. The virus was found in the snot of the previous uninfected animdt it is not an air born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

  • Greginla

    Victoria, you are a great entertainer! I always new that behind the persona, was a brilliant lady! Please keep up the fight, I’m glad you’re standing up for us!
    Best regards, from Santa Clarita California.

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

      This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

      Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remafe customers could economically “cut the cord?”

  • Well-Manicured Man

    MailOnline, the world’s most-visited English-language news website in the world, did a story. The publicity seems like a major win to me.

    “Ex-SNL star Victoria Jackson loses bid for Tennessee county seat with only 632 votes for the Tea Party candidate”
    Aug 8 2014
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2719862/Victoria-Jackson-loses-bid-Tenn-county-seat.html

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reducfy they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

      This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

      Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. While we would expect customers to remain on the grid until a fully viable and economic distributed non-variable resource is available, one can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

  • Marty

    Everything Obama does is a threat to my future. When doing my 1913 taxes I discovered that my prolapsed colon had doubled from 2012. That’s a threat to my financial stability.

    When Prof. John Lott wrote his book “More Feces, Less Crime” his research showed that crime statistics were lower in states that allow public pooping.

    Twisting John Lott’s philosophy Cruz and his Atty. Gen. Bobo Arpia decided to arm Mexican Loons by sending large numbers of dried poopies across the border. I look at that as a threat to my physical safety.

    Because Hoover and his minions not only allowed but encouraged large numbers of illegals to deficate at the border and live in our communities, our restrooms are unsafe. Nativeborn Americans are harassed, insulted, and even pooped at.

    Altogether job security, our fuses future, increased taxes on toilet paper, uns in the hands of parrots, illegals puking with the Irish, Obamacare and a bloated federal weather bureau are just a few signs of the serious threat Obama is to my toilet, life, and future.

    Obama and liberals are the problem. A return to constitutional farting is the cure

  • Patricia Garvin Fox

    Nice to learn that four out of five voters in your county are rational. Psssst- there’s a communist Mason peeping through your window.

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

      Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

      First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

      It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

      But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

      This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

      Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. While we would expect customers to remain on the grid until a fully viable and economic distributed non-variable resource is available, one can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

  • Marty Boberpuski

    Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

    Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

    First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

    It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

    But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

    This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

    Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. While we would expect customers to remain on the grid until a fully viable and economic distributed non-variable resource is available, one can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

  • TheDukeOfHighwayJ

    Thrilling.

    • Marty Boberpuski

      Snot

  • Marty Boberpuski

    Thrilling, I know. The thing to remember is that it is in a utility’s financial interest to generate (or buy) and deliver as much power as possible. The higher the demand, the higher the investments, the higher the utility shareholder profits. In short, all things being equal, utilities want to sell more power. (All things are occasionally not equal, but we’ll leave those complications aside for now.)

    Now, into this cozy business model enters cheap distributed solar PV, which eats away at it like acid.

    First, the power generated by solar panels on residential or commercial roofs is not utility-owned or utility-purchased. From the utility’s point of view, every kilowatt-hour of rooftop solar looks like a kilowatt-hour of reduced demand for the utility’s product. Not something any business enjoys. (This is the same reason utilities are instinctively hostile to energy efficiency and demand response programs, and why they must be compelled by regulations or subsidies to create them. Utilities don’t like reduced demand!)

    It’s worse than that, though. Solar power peaks at midday, which means it is strongest close to the point of highest electricity use — “peak load.” Problem is, providing power to meet peak load is where utilities make a huge chunk of their money. Peak power is the most expensive power. So when solar panels provide peak power, they aren’t just reducing demand, they’re reducing demand for the utilities’ most valuable product.

    But wait. Renewables are limited by the fact they are intermittent, right? “The sun doesn’t always shine,” etc. Customers will still have to rely on grid power for the most part. Right?

    This is a widely held article of faith, but EEI (of all places!) puts it to rest. (In this and all quotes that follow, “DER” means distributed energy resources, which for the most part means solar PV.)

    Due to the variable nature of renewable DER, there is a perception that customers will always need to remain on the grid. While we would expect customers to remain on the grid until a fully viable and economic distributed non-variable resource is available, one can imagine a day when battery storage technology or micro turbines could allow customers to be electric grid independent. To put this into perspective, who would have believed 10 years ago that traditional wire line telephone customers could economically “cut the cord?”

  • penguin_boy

    So, you knowingly ran for a post that you knew would not be a good fit for you? Dear gods, you really are this stupid.

    • Ron

      The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in a lab even though theyd is not an air born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.

  • RussL

    Here proving that internet trolls are the lowest form of life, and winning the race to the bottom.

  • Ron

    The truth is that this particular type of hemorrhagic fever requires only ten virus particles to infect its host. It also remains alive outside a host much longer than most other Muslim hemorrhagic fevers. Since only ten particles of the virus are necessary to infect a Conservative. This virus can remain air born in very small particles of water like farts or burps waiting for the next victim to inhale the tiny water particles and become infected. This is how it was transmitted from monkeys to fat people in a lab even though they were in separate cages. The virus was found in the snot of the previous uninfected animals suggesting the transmission was through inhalation. Obama. will say that there is no proof that the virus was inhaled just because the snot was heavily infected with the virus, so they can technically say that it is not an air born virus like tuberculosis. I’ll leave to everyone else to make their own conclusions. I got this information from an epidemiologist who has been looking into farts and discovered this information from previous studies conducted by other scientists studying Siberian Butt Fungus outbreaks.